Monday, 31 August 2015

proofs of Yoruban Linguistic antiquity:

Further proofs of Yoruban Linguistic antiquity:
Universal testimony
By syntactic symbols we mean items which a community possesses before it meets outsiders. These items include air, land, water, man, woman, sun; etc. The Isekiri-Yoruba do not have the names of these symbols, similar or identical to Bini. Most of these syntactic symbols are identical or similar in Isekiri-Yoruba and Kamitic. This clearly proves the ultimate origin of the Isekiri-Yoruba is not from Benin.
. Some argue about court language, this is not true because other places, Onitsha, Aboh, Lagos   etc where the Binis also  had political   satellites   never speak  the  Court  language of Benin. The Onitsha   is more   related   to  Isekiri-Yoruba than  Benin.

Isekiri Looks Forward to the Future
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The   linguistic   relationship   between   Isekiri-Yoruba, Onitsha Igbo and Ancient Egyptian
There are legends among the Ebus, Olukumis and the Igalas that the Onitshas are their descendants. The legend says further that as the people left the Niger- Benue confluence, they passed through Ebu-Olukumi. Some deflected to Onitsha while some passed what is now Kwale region to Warri (Ojuma Frank 2006). Isekiri-Yoruba legends also claim that when the Binis conquered Onitsha in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Isekiri-Yoruba Navy's assistance was sought and secured. The legendary founder of Onitsha was Chima. The word "Chima" is cognate with the word “Oritsema” and both seem to be derived from two Egyptian words “Horise” (a god)   And “ma” (know); in Kamitic, in Isekiri-Yoruba and Onitsha languages.



Kabiyesi, Oba Alaiye , Ekeji Orisa(Ojelabi:1982)
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                                                 Portrait of Isekiri Spirituality


The Linguistic Relationship between Isekiri-Yoruba, Onitsha Igbo, ancient Egyptian

English
Kamitic
Isekiri-Yoruba
Onitsha Ibo
To become/give birth
Bi/ba
Bi
Bu
Blow away/go away
Fe
Fe
Fe
Smell
Em
Em
Imi(nose)
Land
Ala/ale
Ale
Ala
Primeval water mother
Nen
Nene
Nem
Create
Se
Se
Ke
To know
Ma
Ma
Ma
Rise
Ru/aru
Ru
Anu
Read/talk
Ro
Ro
Kwo
The Linguistic Family Proof
The Isekiri-Yoruba and the Bini are in totally different linguistic groups, while the Isekiri-Yoruba belongs to the Yoruboid group, the Bini belongs to the Edoid group. The Yoruboid group includes Isekiri-Yoruba, Yorubas, Ebu, Olukumi and Igala; and members of this group are more related to the Fon, Aja, Ewe and Ga from Benin republic to Accra in Ghana, than they are to the Binis(Adu Boahen). Sagay (1982) comments that the    masquerades along this coast stretching from Warri to Accra are cognates. This means most of the Peoples: Fon, Aja, Ga, Ewe, Yoruba and Isekiri-Yoruba are linguistically and religiously related.
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                           Gone to God and far,
                            In this rarest hour we dare
                            Count on this as rare
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 On this linguistic family group hear Alagoa: "From a linguistic view, too, the Ijo of the Delta States differs from neighbouring languages. Ijo belongs to the wide Niger Congo family of African languages along with all the neighbouring languages, and more particularly to the Kwa sub-family along with the Yoruba (Yoruba, Isekiri-Yoruba), Ibo, and Edo (Bini, Urhobo-lsoko, Egene, Epie Atisa, Udekama) within which it forms a distinct group, the Ijo group" (Alagoa 1977: 335).


                                                       His is a rider,
                                                       Riding through the skies and here.
                                                       Here the hours cohere.
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On the linguistic family proof, Obayemi says further:
In South-East Yoruba land, extending from the coastal lagoons to the Rain forest, are to be found the Yoruba speaking peoples grouped together as Ijebu, Ondo, Isekiri and Ikale. In the northeast is the kingdom of Owo, sharing many cultural peculiarities with the central or western Yoruba but in many respects distinct (Ade Obayemi: 1977:220)

  by
Augustine Oritseweyinmi Oghanrandukun Olomu (St.Ifa)
                                    &
Eyebira Emmanuel Agharowu(Honsbira)



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